The skewed perspective of a conservative Catholic employee-side employment lawyer living in the most exciting city in the Milky Way, Las Vegas, Nevada USA, who listens to a lot of really strange music and who, for some reason, lives and dies St. Louis Cardinal baseball

3/12/2005

Canada-bashing at the Weekly Standard

My blog is turning into a sort of repository for Canada-bashing. And why not?

Matt Labash, the resident moderate on the staff of the Weekly Standard, engages in a disappointingly balanced look at The Great Smug North. You have to get through a lot of balance before you get to the meat of Labash's bashing. Favorite passage:

So I spent three days on Nexis kicking up every comparison-survey and statistic I could find on American/Canadian values. I became so gripped with the subject I could have been mistaken for a Canadian. This unscientific research quickly confirmed that Canadians are bizarrely obsessed with us, binge-eating out of our cultural trough, then pretending it tastes bad. Plainly the two things Canada needs most are a mirror and a good psychiatrist.
Goodness gracious, doesn't that line completely encapsulate the Canadian cultural identity that is wholly predicated on its status as "not America." Once he finally, gets into the bashing spirit, the good stuff flows:

While Canadians pride themselves on knowing more about us than we do about them (undoubtedly true), the problem--captured in a survey done for Canada Day in 2000--is that even historically challenged Americans know more about ourselves than Canadians do about themselves. In parallel 10-question quizzes on everything from our first president/prime minister to the words of our respective national anthems, 63 percent of Americans scored five or more right answers. Only 39 percent of Canadians did. One Canadian television critic expressed disbelief, writing, "Average Americans appear to be in worse shape--judging by the evidence on TV, anyway." She would know, since at the time of her comment, 92 percent of the comedies and 85 percent of the dramas on Canadian television were made elsewhere, mainly in America.

It's long, but worth the read.
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